JUL/AUG 2015 EDITOR’S DESK

Larry Iles Koi USA EditorEDITOR’S DESK
By Larry Iles

If you are reading this you are taking part in a celebration of excellence and a moment in history.

 

This issue of Koi USA Magazine marks the beginning of our 40th year, and we need to say thank you to a lot of people for making that possible.

 

There have been many writers, supporters, editors, and unheralded volunteers over the years, but each and every one owes it all to one good man named Ed.

 

Ed Fujimoto had already retired from many years of service in the US Air Force and was busy enjoying his 2nd career as a civilian. Life was good, and then one day he went to a koi show in San Diego. It is kind of amazing that a man who had spent much of his military career in Japan had to come back home to America to discover Nishikigoi, but that is exactly how it happened. Like so many of us, that first glimpse of the beauty of a Sanke set the hook, and he began his journey as a koi hobbyist. Years passed, his involvement in the hobby grew, and he eventually helped found the Nishiki Koi Club. Many of his fellow Club members had a hunger to learn all they could, but were unable to speak or read Japanese.

 

Bear in mind, in 1975 the information age we now take for granted wasn’t even a pipe dream. The printed word was the only thing available to the masses, and there were no books or magazines available in English, save a few translated from Japanese. Anyone who has ever spent much time reading translations from ANY language into English can attest to the fact that a lot of the meaning gets lost in translation. Words that mean little in one language can have great depth in another, and learning to speak “koi appreciation” is more than just reading words.

 

Ed’s friends wanted to learn, Ed wanted to help, so Ed went to work. With no experience to guide him he became Publisher, writer, and Editor of Koi USA Magazine. It was only 2 dozen pages, Black and White, and hand delivered by Ed himself… but so began the magazine you are holding in your hands today.

 

I truly hope that Ed is smiling down on us with some sense of satisfaction because we owe his example of “Friendship through Scales” nothing but our best. After all, he set a great example for all of us to follow. And not to rest on his laurels, Ed also founded the AKCA and the PNKCA!

 

Speaking of his great example of sharing knowledge with friends, we have an information packed issue to kick off our 40th year. Taro Kodama gives us valuable insights into understanding koi nutrition and good food; Ted Baughman and Bernie Woollands take us inside the ring at the Washington Koi Show and last year’s All England Koi Show. And James Reilly shares a good Ramble on the distinctive traits of Showa and Sanke. All good stuff.

 

Ron Nugent shares a BIG 40th Anniversary thank you with us all, and Kate McGill-Andrews shares “A California Experience” with everyone. (If you aren’t from California, somebody needs to tell you about the really good stuff), and I’m sure you’ll enjoy hearing about the AKCA Business Meeting and Wet Lab held in Houston last year. It was a great event this year, too, so we’re looking forward to Don and Brenda sharing the 2015 highlights with us real soon.

 

Danny Benjamin shares with us a very informative article on Biosecurity and Koi in Israel, where a tremendous amount of research has been performed and put in practice over the years. There is much to learn from this.

 

Speaking of biosecurity, koi health, and all that jazz, we are happy to have Dr. Ling Jin share an article with us about the recent AKCA visit to OSU’s KHV Research Facilities. AKCA and Koi USA have played a major role in funding the important research going on at OSU, and we are incredibly proud of the tremendous work they have done. There is much more to come on this in upcoming issues, so please stay tuned for more.

 

And now it is time for more: More reading for your edification and enjoyment that is, so carry on and Happy Koi Ponds to everyone reading Koi USA!

 

(PS: THANKS, ED J )

 

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